Full disclosure, this post is personal. I have terrible vision. I started wearing glasses when I was about 8 years old. By the time I was 11, I was begging my Mom for contact lenses. This was in the 80’s when high school girls and secretaries in movies would take their glasses off and suddenly be transformed from invisible to gorgeous. Glasses were not pretty – that’s the message I received loud and clear. Thus began a lifelong struggle with glasses, I would only wear them at home, if at all, never in public, and half the time I fell asleep with my contact lenses on. Even as the decades passed and glasses became the fashion accessory du jour, I couldn’t enjoy them. Why? Because my vision is so bad my lenses looked like the proverbial coke bottles, and turned my eyes into blinking little beads.

So that brings us to today. My prescription is -8 in my right eye and -11 in my left. I can’t see ANYTHING without glasses or contacts, but I have found a way to wear my glasses without feeling completely self conscious – three words: High Index Lenses. If your prescription is crazy high like mine, you should get the thinnest possible lens, which is the High Index 1.74. Anything +/- 6 you definitively need them. Another trick I’ve learned is to ask for no edge polish. When your lenses are VERY thick, polished edges call even more attention to them.

Here’s one of our expert opticians, Amanda, talking about the benefits of High Index 1.74 lenses.

 

If your prescription is between +/- 2 and 6, you could get the High Index 1.67 lenses. The 1.74 are the thinnest, but they aren’t available with tinting or progressives, so you may need the 1.67 if you’re looking for those add-ons. The other varieties of lenses – plastic and polycarbonate – aren’t great if you have a prescription that’s +/- 3. High Index lenses are a bit more expensive but well worth avoiding the coke bottle look!

All our high index lenses come with scratch resistant and UV coatings for no additional cost. You can learn more about all the lens types we offer at FramesDirect.com here.

Also see How Do Glasses Work?

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